Recommended Timeframes

The following table provides general information on how frequently to be tested for STIs. Please use the table as a guide, but note that testing frequency should be discussed individually with your doctor or nurse practitioner. Testing frequency should be determined by the type of sex work you do, the services you offer, sexual risks and symptoms. In some states and territories frequency is determined by legislation or regulation, mandated by workplace rules, or is self regulated.

Depending on sexual risks and symptoms, testing may simply involve one swab or urine test and one blood test, or in some cases, a self collected swab. The complete list of infections and tests are listed in the table below. The window period between exposure and a positive test varies depending on the type of test used.

Should a condom break or you experience symptoms, visit a sexual health centre.

Test Site When to test**
Chlamydia
Vagina (cervix)* 3-monthly
Urine 3-monthly
Rectum (if anal sex)* 3-monthly
Throat 3-monthly
Gonorrhoea
Vagina (cervix)* 3-monthly
Urine 3-monthly
Rectum (if anal sex)* 3-monthly
Throat 3-monthly
Hepatitis A
Blood Once, before immunisation
Hepatitis B
Blood Once, before immunisation
Hepatitis C
Blood Only if blood exposure
HIV
Blood At least twice a year
Syphilis
Blood 3-6 monthly
Herpes
Lesion If symptoms appear
Trichomoniasis
Vagina 3-monthly
Candida (Thrush)
Vagina If symptoms appear
Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
Vagina If symptoms appear

* May be a self-collected swab
** In the case of a high-risk event, test at 7 days after potential exposure